Grower System Details

Container: Container is a soft forty five gallon malleable fabric grow pot. The diameter of the grow pot is roughly three feet and the height is eighteen inches. Not displayed in the image above are two side handles attached on opposite sides of the grow pot. The cloth material drains very well, an essential feature for promoting vine health.

Proprietary soil blend: Soil for the planters will be purchased from Skyland USA, a soil provider specifically focused on urban rooftops. Skyland USA makes several soil products called rooflite. Modeling the planter systems after those installed on Rooftop Reds, Village Vines has selected three rooflite soil products to mimic the horizon zones found in a traditional vineyard. These are rooflite semi-intensive light, rooflite base light and rooflite drainage light. The soil is also custom balanced to have ample moisture-holding capacity and available nitrogen to promote overall vine vigor and growth

Rock layer (subsoil zone): Our viticulture expert Stephen Scarnato, owner of Long Island Vine Care, recommends that the bottom of each planter have a rock layer to help with drainage. Steven suggests that we cover the bottom of the planter with large stones and then place smaller stones on top. This stone layer shouldn’t exceed three inches from the bottom of the planter.

Vines, in particular, don’t like wet roots and this rock layer will go a long way towards ensuring successful fruit production.

Trellis system: The natural environment will be used to train the vines. The trellis system on display in the planter design image will not be used.

Pest Net: A non-obtrusive, fine, white plastic netting will be wrapped around the fruit zone during the month of August and will be removed in September after harvest. This pest net will keep birds and bees away from the grapes as their sugars start to develop. The net will only cover the first foot of the grape vine, the fruit zone, while the remaining two feet of canopy above the netting will continue its “open air” growth.

 
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